Sunday, May 17, 2015

Update on Area Restaurants in Northeast Texas and Southeast Oklahoma


Inside Liefie li Vine Restaurant in Winnsboro, Texas


Over the last seven years, I have written of “things to do” in Paris, Mt. Pleasant, Sulphur Springs, Greenville and other close-by communities.  A few eating suggestions were included but now I have discovered some new eateries of note – all within driving distance for lunch or dinner. 

Exterior of Thai Lanna's
Inside Thai Lanna's in Mt. Pleasant
On the exterior,  Thai Lanna’s is as indistinctive a restaurant as one would ever frequent.  Located on the access road to I-30 in Mt. Pleasant and next to a Super 8 Motel, it’s easy to miss.  But inside is a beautiful, clean space with freshly made Thai food to order.  Owner Kanyasiri  “Jeed” Castle closely supervises the kitchen and often delivers dishes directly to a customer’s table.  Her mango and sticky rice dessert charmed even my chocolate loving husband.  If you’ve never experienced Thai cuisine or if you’ve been missing it, try this nearby locale.  Just don’t expect fiery.

Downtown Sulphur Springs continues to improve with a completed square renovation and updated, landscaped side streets.  As so often happens, restaurants follow improvements.  In addition to previously recommended Lou Viney’s Restaurant and Pub and the Pioneer Café, Cajun food is now available at Bayou Jack’s Cajun Grill on the square.  Their gumbo was authentic and shrimp salad satisfying.  The lunch crowd of working men seemed to appreciate the portions.  Save dessert for the Idzi Bitsy Bakery around the corner. 

Lobby of Texan Theater in Greenville, Tx
Inside Texan Theater in Greenville, Tx.
A very recent addition to downtown Greenville is the stunning Texas Theater, a former Opera House that had been shuttered since 1975.  Native Barbara Horan took on the challenging project of renovating an old theater and the results are spectacular.  In the lobby is a sleek coffee shop where a very decent cappuccino can be had as well as breakfast and lunch offerings.  Inside, tables seating 120 face the stage and are placed on several levels.  Recent performers have included Rick Springfield, Jimmie Vaughan, David Alan Coe, The Mills Brothers and Jeremiah Johnson.  Prices for tickets are high but include a four course meal, all drinks, tax, tip and the show.  It’s amazing to have this offering within driving distance.

Dipping south a bit to Winnsboro is Liefie li Vine, a South African themed restaurant owned by the Styrdom family.  Few know what to expect on first visit but waiters and owners are ready with explanations of anything on the menu.  Many American favorites such as prime rib are offered but it’s the ethnic offerings that are most intriguing.  Flat iron steak comes with a splash of traditional  monkey sauce .  I leave that to you to get an explanation.  A covered patio in the back makes for a relaxed evening.  My favorite part was the opportunity to sign up for a safari as you entered as well as the African gift shop.  This place is very popular.  Try going early and visiting downtown Winnsboro before dinner.

Shannon Mitchell's Grateful Head T-Shirt
Back north of the Red River are some relatively new restaurants in Broken Bow.  One stands out – Grateful Head Pizza Oven and Taproom - named after the owners’ favorite band.  This popular pizza place has had to expand 5 times and now includes its own gift shop.  I realized it had been discovered locally when I saw a Grateful Head t-shirt on a Lamar County Clerk’s employee.  Shannon Mitchell declared the restaurant her family’s favorite and we compared pizza choices.   By internet standards, the Funky Chicken pizza appears to be most popular but Shannon and I preferred the Tree Hugger.   Best time to go is in the evening when live music is available.  You may even catch Lamar County Deputy Reggie Daus playing in the Krissy Green Band.

I don’t want to forget recent additions to the Paris scene, especially downtown.  Perry’s Off the Square describes its offerings as “elevated comfort food”  - translated as favorites with a twist.   The decor is lovely and hopefully, we can dine outside soon if the weather would stay cleared.  107 wishes the same thing.  On nice evenings, this open air bar is wonderful for a cold beer and light dinner.  According to friends, nearby Phat Phil’s serves up good BBQ, coleslaw and potato salad from a trailer near Market Square.  And, Paris finally has its own Louisiana fare with Cajun Moon Grill and Bar on the west side of town – a welcome addition to an area with few food offerings.  Families, couples, and singles like this lively restaurant.  It works for lunch or a Friday night celebration.

The good news is the independent restaurant explosion in the U.S. has moved into our territory.  Chains are no longer our only option.  We just have to drive a bit to sample them all and this summer would be a good time to start. Bon appétit.






Tuesday, May 5, 2015

A Peace Corps Family

In front of church in Antigua, ,Guatemala


School event in Chimazat, Guatemala

 I’ve never been in the Peace Corps.  It was tempting but my oldest brother beat me to it, getting posted to Ecuador in 1973.   A niece joined in 2004, our son in 2006, another niece in 2008, and the first niece again in 2015.   It became almost a rite of passage for our family and provided interesting places to visit.

The program has beckoned to altruistically inclined college graduates since its beginning in 1961.  At the time, a commitment of two years to a distant country guaranteed a degree of hardship.  When my brother left for Ecuador, we hoped to see him once in the next 27 months.  He trained for three months in Puerto Rico, theoretically learning the language, and was dispatched to Agato, Ecuador, an indigenous village outside of Otavalo, a town two hours north of Quito, the capital. 
We had only the Peace Corps post office address for him and he had no phone.  As the town’s first volunteer, Mack had to find accommodations.  A second story floor was put in a barn which kept him dry but all had to duck under the large wooden beams to move about.  No electricity or running water was available.  He  built his own outhouse.  Fortunately, the community well was close and water could be hauled in large buckets.  Propane fueled his lanterns and stove.  Evenings ended and mornings began early.

My family visited Mack in 1974.  We stayed “in town” in Otavalo and quickly came down with amoebic dysentery.  Yet, I fell in love with the country and when a teaching job in Quito became available, I stayed for 15 months.  With the Peace Corps office near my home, I often stopped by as a kind of volunteer wannabe.   The volunteers were an independent lot, seemingly capable of putting up with anything.  Those posted to Quito had an easier time of it but the ones in the countryside had better stories. Mack liked it so much, he stayed an extra year.

At Lindsay Clark's home in Honduras
Lindsay's kitchen in Honduras
Fast forward 30 years to Honduras where our niece, Lindsay, was sent.  After she picked us up at the Tegucigalpa airport, we stopped by the Peace Corps office.  Times had changed but the laid back, open door, notices on the bulletin board environment had not.  As we drove to her small town, Lindsay calmly recounted stories of persons killed by machetes in her community but then with the usual Peace Corps odd juxtaposition of experiences, we joined her friends that night for a family birthday party with music and dancing.  This trip was cut short because of my sudden appendicitis.  Fortunately, the Peace Corps emergency number guided us to an appropriate hospital for surgery.





At Walker Clark's home in Chimazat, Guatemala
Two years later, our son joined.  He could have gone to an Eastern European country a year earlier but waited to get posted to Spanish speaking Guatemala.  Walker was also sent to a small town where strawberry farmers hoped he could instruct on how to grow those big strawberries sold in the U.S.  He knew nothing about strawberries, an initial disappointment to all.  In the end, he helped organize a co-op with marketing techniques for their product.  He also stayed a third year.

One year later, a second niece joined and was sent to western Ukraine, a country already split between two cultures.  None of the clothes Elizabeth brought were warm enough for the winters and a fur coat was her first purchase.  She lived in a city and taught English while learning the very difficult Ukrainian language.  Elizabeth has been our go-to person for context in the current Ukraine/Russia face-off.

This year, niece Lindsay joined the Peace Corps a second time with her husband.  They had just been posted to Vanuatu, a tiny country of islands in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, when Cyclone Pam slammed it.  Peace Corps chartered a plane to evacuate their volunteers before the storm arrived.  Lindsay and Sean waited in Australia until word came they were returning to Vanuatu to serve as emergency care workers. 

The Peace Corps has adjusted with the times.  Countries have come and gone according to political situations.  No driving is allowed but cell phones are - a godsend for those left at home.   Rules for drinking have been tightened.  Safety is the number one concern.  And it now offers a college program for returning volunteers, a benefit all our recent family members have used. 


Town home in Xela, Guateamala
A common topic in our family is whether the Peace Corps is that helpful for the locals.   All agree the greatest benefit is to the Volunteer who returns more confident and realistic about the world.  After my brother helped build a water line into his village, he became a water expert for the state of California.  As a nurse, Lindsay has often used her Spanish proficiency.  From Elizabeth’s experiences, she recognized the need for smart fund raising and now does that for Habitat for Humanity in Chicago.  And our son continues to use his fluent Spanish with his beautiful Guatemalan wife and son – the best argument of all to continue the program. 

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